Engaging with Aging’s 5th Anniversary 

Five years ago this month, after listening to me rant about how inaccurately the aging experience had been portrayed to me when I was younger, a highly respected colleague challenged me to write a blog that portrayed it more accurately. Me, a 95 year-old social media troglodyte write a blog? Impossible!

But my years of working with creative nursing faculty members had taught me to at least look at what was behind any door of opportunity that was opened to me. So, I began to explore whether my book-writing skills could be translated into blog-writing ones.  A virtual friend volunteered to set it up and run it for me. And so, after weeks of practicing, Engaging with Aging was born in late summer, 2017.

I decided to write for my fellow agers, not as an aging expert, but as an experienced fellow lab- rat who was running each day’s maze of daily living with aging capacities as they were. I knew that each of us had our own situations and that they could vary widely. Thus, I saw the blogs not as “how-to’s”, but as “bread upon the water” for anyone who found the thoughts useful.

I was regularly seeking and incorporating current scientific background about my own aging processes and adaptations. So I didn’t review or cite the articles in the blog but wove it into each blog as I had in my own EWA approaches.

 Because I was a healthy, asymptomatic 95 year-old, I was able to write about normal age related changes unaffected by diseases.  After all, normally aging capacities plus available and usable resources are all any of us have available to  balance with the requirements of our daily living 

I had a broad view of requirements that made demands on our capacities and resources. Beyond routine tasks I included: experiencing the prospect or reality of pathology itself, and its medical management, climate changes, relationships with others (including many who were outsiders to the aging experience), plus everything else that entered my daily living and had to be managed physically or emotionally.

I had no idea whether this tentative approach would find acceptance in the midst of the hundreds of other blogs on aging, whose authors seemed to know exactly how to manage this aging experience. (I checked and found some authors were still decidedly pre-aged.)

Little did I dream that so many viewers would find EWA worthy of their attention. (1,000+ currently opt to receive it automatically on their computers, and the EWA blog has had viewers in 110+ countries.)

In the beginning, ideas for blogs emerged more quickly than I could write them. Now, after producing 230 postings, my 100 year old brain is providing me with a mere trickle. It’s true that “to everything there is a season. . .” Ecclesiastes 3:1.

I’ve talked with others about stopping altogether, but they’ve suggested that I continue to publish EWA postings whenever I have one ready. So this is the approach I will take for now.  I’ve no idea how often new ideas will present themselves. (Subscribing will assure you of receiving them if this is important to you.)  To subscribe go to any blog posting .  On the right side of the text on the first page of any posted EWA blog you will find the following instructions:

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Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

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25 thoughts on “Engaging with Aging’s 5th Anniversary 

  1. Congratulations on five years. I am a faithful reader and appreciate all the guidance you have provided me for ushering both my parents and myself through all the many adaptations we can make to enable independence to whatever extent possible. Thank you.

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  2. Engaging with Aging has been a blessing to me in many ways. I am so glad that you took on the challenge and that you continue at whatever frequency works for you. Your honesty and creative ways of dealing with ARC are a breath of fresh air. The fact that I know you only adds to the blessing. Your friendship over many years and your wisdom have influenced my life. Thank you!!

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  3. Please continue with your postings. You are an encouragement and a blessing to me.

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

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  4. As a relatively well functioning 95 year old, I have found valuable insights, sensible advice and even joy and comfort in your delightful blogs. I’d love to read more from time to time – my sincere thanks and best wishes!

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

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  5. I look forward to your posts. Your perspective is valuable to us as we continue to age. Thank you for using your energy and putting your thoughts down. You and your words are a credit to the nursing community. Thank you!

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  6. Doris, I happened across your blog just last year. I immediately read through the entire thread, and have been a subscriber since. Your voice from within our aging community has been both calming and inspirational. I do hope you will continue, occasionally, to share your thoughts and insights as you feel the impulse. Thank you so very much, David Batchelder

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  7. Happy Blogoversary! So glad you are sharing your life with us. Please don’t feel like you must write to any kind of schedule. I come across writers who lament that they “missed” a scheduled post, or that they are having trouble fulfilling a certain schedule. Write when YOU have something to say. Maybe it’s every day for awhile. Maybe it’s once a week. Maybe once a month. It’s your blog and you get to make those decisions. As a faithful reader, I will read your work whenever it appears and be glad for it. You are a trailblazer.

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  8. Thank you for sharing your insights….I find this very helpful, and often mention this blog to family and friends. Good luck and thank you!

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  9. I really hope that you continue to write your blogs at least now and then. At 70 I’m attempting to learn as much as possible…………in the hopes that I make it to 100 plus!!

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  10. What a sensible solution. As always, you have analysed the situation and come up with an excellent solution. I am sure you will continue to develop and to have highly original insights, but I hate to think that you might feel obligated to continue a regular flow of blog posts. Until now I’ve found every article as it arrives on WordPress’s Reader, but now I’ve subscribed to receive notice by email. Thanks reminding me of that option: it will work well. Meantime, please stay well and continue to be your splendid self.

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  11. Happy 5th bloggoversary – 5 years is a big deal in the blogging world so Congrats!
    But an even bigger deal is the fact that 5 years ago at age 95 you decided to go for it and get your wisdom, insights, daily living as ‘green and growing’ out into the blogging world for us to relish and learn from. You saw the gap in ‘lab-rat’ info on the experience of aging and jumped right in to fill it. Please thank your techie friend from me who enabled you to go-online with a WP website – that was a labor of love.
    I only just discovered your website a few weeks ago – what a tremendous blessing for me to have found you –
    peace

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  12. Congratulations on a very special anniversary! My husband and I became readers the year before the pandemic, and your blog has meant so much to us. Your recent decision to write “when the Spirit moves you” (as my late mother often said) seems just right to me. I will always refer back to your previous posts, and I look forward to the new ones whenever you want to share some more of your unique wisdom. You will always hold a special place in my heart.

    Murray S.

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  13. Dear Doris, HAPPY 5th EWA Blog Anniversary! I hope this finds you well.

    I am happy to hear that you will continue to write and post blogs as you have them available. I am certain your over 1,000 readers agree! You need not put yourself on a schedule for publication.

    I seem to be busier than normal these days as my daughter enters her 38th week of pregnancy. We are happily helping out with almost 2-year-old Reed, assisting them with household projects and “freezer” meal preparation so they have plenty of healthy food available once the baby arrives. It’s a joy to spend time in the kitchen with my daughter cooking!

    I will keep you posted about the new baby. Let me know if you are open to a visit in August (masked and distanced). I understand that visits are tiring, though, so please don’t feel obliged.

    All the best. Janet

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  14. Congratulations, dear Doris! I’ve taken to using your name as a verb when I need to pay special attention, especially when attempting something new. I remind myself to “doris” and find that “dorising” is incredibly helpful 😉
    Write when your lovely spirit moves you.

    Love you madly,
    Julia

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  15. Thanks for writing, but for me, I would really appreciate it if the print were larger than the print on a prescription bottle. And most of all, I congratulate you for being successful. I know that you have much for which to proud. Take care and God Bless and continue to thrive.

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  16. As many others have commented, your blog entries are enlightening and very practical to those of us 20-30 years younger. So do please keep writing when the ideas come, but feel no pressure to adhere to a schedule. I’m grateful for all you’ve shared over the five years, and happy to see each one pop up in my email. I can’t help but think that learning to use new technology (like inserting graphics) and actively creating on a regular basis is keeping your brain young and engaged! Win-win!

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  17. Doris~ happy anniversary, and thank you for all the posts that have let us share your journey & then apply it to our life and practice. Agree with others, there is no time line to follow, post when you have something to share. And enjoy rereading all the comments of the impact you continue to have. Katherine

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