Why My EWA Blog Doesn’t Address Pathology or Trauma-Affected Daily Living

Everyone who survives into the latter years of the lifespan experiences progressing, accumulating ARCs (age related changes) that affect all aspects of their daily living. On top of what’s natural and normal, most will also experience pathology and trauma and the demands of its management. These further affect agers’ requirement in daily living and their resources for managing them.

I came to aging well-armed with book-knowledge about and some experience in caring for people with both normal aging and pathology prevalent in aging. I thought I knew what to expect. And, as far as those expectations went, it was useful. But it was not enough! I’ve been one of the fortunate agers whose health seemed to remain intact. My ARCs emerged, progressed and accumulated, just as the books said they would.   What I haven’t experienced is the overlay of pathology or serious trauma.

Given this background, I found that what I hadn’t learned as an outsider was the reality of ever-present ARC impact on so much of my daily living. I began to live with Hyman Rickover’s insight that “the devil is in the details, but so is the salvation”.   My constellation of ARCs (even in my daily living as a healthy, well supported, super-ager), bedevil me and trip me up throughout each day. I struggle to understand, to learn, to adapt, to work over or around them or eliminate what I can’t manage. As an inside-ager, I’m respectfully gaining new working knowledge daily.

I am realizing that my normal ARCs plus the knowledge I have of them and the skills I have developed in dealing with them are all that I or any other ager “bring to the table” when pathology or trauma add new requirements to daily living and alter my capacities and resources for managing them.

Given my own situation, I feel honest in writing about my insider daily-living-with-my- normal ARCS . I know that this is important and will affect actually living with pathology and its management if or when it occurs. I can only speculate how specific pathologies and their management could:

alter specific capacities I now have

increase/modify the requirements in my daily living

change my relationships with my support figures and external assets.

I also have learned that my relationships with family, care providers and friends are more effective when I neutrally and honestly communicate my EWA status and its impact to them. I expect that this same deliberate transparency should apply in my interaction with those who will help me manage my EWAing with the overlay of pathology and it’s management.   And, since there can be a risk of my losing my thinking/community capacities, I’d be wise to prepare my designated care providers to be able to be my voice in communicating with health care providers if I no longer can. I’m actively doing that.

There’s an old saying that “the shoemaker should stick to his last”. I take it to mean that I should know what I can write about, write it well and not go beyond that.

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So, I leave it to fellow-agers who are actually living with normal ARCs and the overlay of pathologies and their management to share the reality-based, specialized working knowledge and arts they have gained in their own blogs.   And of course your comments on my EWA posts that offer insights of application to your different situations can offer EWA readers and me insights that are useful.

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6 thoughts on “Why My EWA Blog Doesn’t Address Pathology or Trauma-Affected Daily Living

  1. As always, your well-thought out perceptions of our aging experience are keen and to the point. They are also very much appreciated and as ever, enjoyable reading.

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  2. You certainly know how to turn a phrase! I love to read your posts because they are clear and well thought out. And I enjoy hearing how you cope with ARCs. I’m learning, too, and glad to have a guide like you. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Your unsubscribe link at the bottom of your email doesn’t seem to be working.

    On Wed, Sep 11, 2019 at 6:07 PM Engaging With Aging wrote:

    > engagingwithagingblog posted: “Everyone who survives into the latter years > of the lifespan experiences progressing, accumulating ARCs (age related > changes) that affect all aspects of their daily living. On top of what’s > natural and normal, most will also experience pathology and trauma” >

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  4. Doris–Love your insight. I tried emailing you but it bounced back. Would like to connect regarding getting your input on our “aging” conference in October

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  5. Hi Doris – I have also been enjoying your blog since I heard about you from Dr. Steve. I am working with him on the autumn conference and your email bounced back. Would you kindly email me so we might connect?

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  6. I read your blog posts eagerly each week. Since my husband and I now care for my 98-year-old father, who is in remarkably good shape and who lives with us, as well as not getting any younger ourselves (!), I find your clear descriptions and observations both enjoyable (thanks to your sense of humor) and helpful. Thank you for sharing your life with all of us.

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